(Note from Slate’s lawyers: Observations not guaranteed to help you win.). We are now open to everyone, everywhere. To the right? Sometimes somebody will submit a caption that addresses one thing going on in the cartoon, but not something else that's pretty obvious. So you could've been a four-time winner. A colleague emailed me that article, by Patrick House. I think you have to do that; I think every finalist does. If not, I usually just give up. Anyway I thought so. I think I submitted an entry to the first weekly contest. Oh, an aggressive one. The New Yorker magazine has a weekly feature: the cartoon caption contest. Most people who look at the winners of the caption contest say, “I could’ve done better than that.” You’re right. All rights reserved. It also helps, of course, if you have the best entry. Laughing out loud is, in this context, an unseemly act sure to draw unwanted attention. But I have. And what better archetype of urban ennui could there be than a man in a cardigan holding a drink, yapping on his cell phone while blissfully unaware of looming dangers? You know: "That works.". He won the New Yorker Cartoon Caption contest and dislikes Cuba. It’s quite another to win, say, the Pillsbury Bakeoff, an essay contest, the National History Day Contest … Or the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest. I don't mean to sound ungrateful. Now that you know your gatekeeper, it’s time for some advanced joke theory. Use common, simple, monosyllabic words. Neither. It helps if, like me, you have no shame. He's right that sometimes you see a winning caption that's clever but not really funny. Join Slate Plus to continue reading, and you’ll get unlimited access to all our work—and support Slate’s independent journalism. The Cartoon Caption Contest get live with exciting prizes. By joining Slate Plus you support our work and get exclusive content. You learn that the Caption Contest has a new editor and your fantasy that the New Yorker was secretly grooming you for the role evaporates, along with your last shred of decency. Larry Wood's forte is winning the New Yorker's Caption Contest, in which readers are invited to submit the perfect quip to accompany the magazine's … ” It turns out that there is a complicated thought process that should go into crafting your entry. Wood spoke to TIME about how to game the contest and how he gets out the vote. I think the more successful captions address everything that's going on. Your caption was not unique. Humor and victory are different matters entirely. Anna October 10, 2020 Leave a Comment. The odd thing is, I don't think the ones I've submitted that were selected as finalists were as strong as some that were ignored. In this Contest they give you print your caption and name in the magazine as the winning … Generate a caption as many times as you’d like — then, submit it to The New Yorker. Slate relies on advertising to support our journalism. Welcome to the Cartoon Caption Contest at CartoonCollections.com where we take perfectly good cartoons and let YOU try to make them better. Larry Wood's forte is winning the New Yorker's Caption Contest, in which readers are invited to submit the perfect quip to accompany the magazine's back-page cartoon. Their weekly caption contest invites readers to write a caption for that weeks’ cartoon. I'll email everyone in my agency, which has about 200 people. There could have been 100 people who sent in something along the same lines. Check. E-mail everyone you know. The drawing is by P. C. Vey. First, I Googled my fellow finalists: a legislative director in New York and a public-affairs director in Seattle. And I did. The New Yorker Bound: The 1980s; Virgil Partch: "Guess Who!" I'll depart from Patrick House here. In both cases, what you need is a lot of ideas, and a technique to tip the odds a bit in your direction. They feature a cartoon and readers are invited to submit funny captions. You’ve run out of free articles. And I thought of the caption (registration required). The winner gets his or her name in The New Yorker and receives an autographed print of the cartoon (retail value ~$250). © 2019 TIME USA, LLC. A while. You could have. The New Yorker magazine, noting the popularity of its cartoon caption contest, has created a caption contest board game and issued a book with the most interesting cartoons and winning captions as well as comprehensive information covering this theme. He does not make eye contact. I come to work on Monday, and the first thing I do is log onto the New Yorker website and check out the cartoon for 10 minutes or so. The first line of defense at The New Yorker is the cartoon editor’s assistant, a twentysomething from Texas named Farley Katz. Try to incorporate everything that's going on in the cartoon. An exemplary New Yorker theory of mind caption (accompanying a cartoon of a police officer ticketing a caveman with a large wheel): “Yeah, yeah—and I invented the ticket.” The humor here requires inference about the caveman’s beliefs and intentions as he (presumably) explains to the cop that he invented the wheel. Kiss babies, shake hands, and play to win. Admittedly, the odds of both are daunting. Please don't take me to court over my entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #732 for November 9, 2020. But there are others I've seen — not mine, I hasten to add — that really are terrific and funny. When more than one person submits the winning caption, they just choose a winner at random. I would've guessed about every other week [out of 192]. I just tried to think about stereotypical things people think about dolphins and panhandlers. Mildly amusing at best? OK, I admit it. Everyone must get your joke. Check. I don't know how far and wide that goes, but I email the people I'm in regular contact with. Nobody wants to feel that The New Yorker is above them, and the last thing they need is to have a cartoon joke go over their heads, lest they write a whole Seinfeld episode about it. My winning caption: “O.K. Here’s the cartoon. The second time was when I won it. My Entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #716 Try not to get too close to my entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #716 for … What's your approach to writing these captions? He said not to try to be too funny. I’m at the window. These observations have been culled from months of research and are guaranteed to help you win, too. Nope. You create a second New Yorker account for submitting multiple captions in clear violation of the Caption Contest’s rules, because you’re a monster. The first time was when I finished 3rd in the caption contest. I'm careful to delete from that email group the two or three people that I know hate me, because I don't want them to launch some kind of counter-offensive. People read The New Yorker to stay on top of the cultural world if they happen to be smart or—if they’re just faking it—in the hope of receiving some sort of osmotic transfer of IQ if they hold the magazine tight enough. There is one mantra to take from this article, worth its own line break: You are not trying to submit the funniest caption; you are trying to win The New Yorker’s caption contest. This week, Bob Mankoff responds to a letter submitted by a participant in the New Yorker's Caption Contest. To understand what makes the perfect caption, you must start with the readership. New Yorker Weekly Caption Contest One of the most popular caption contest examples around is from the New Yorker. The newspaper then chooses 3 finalists from all submissions and lets their audience vote for their favorite. That's just the luck of the draw. A total of 47 words. All you have to do is win our bi-weekly, soon-to-be-weekly, and maybe-someday-daily, caption contest and you’ll have enough money to buy a signed copy of The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons from us for the hundred bucks you win. He suffers from urban ennui. He may have a hit show, millions of dollars, and a beautiful wife, but he has never won The New Yorker caption contest. Dolphins are intelligent. Enter your caption below for a chance to win the envy of your peers. Contact with big thumbs up to Roger Ebert—the film critic has finally won the cartoon-caption contest the... For these themes in your cartoon and readers are invited to submit funny captions that you 're with! Addresses one thing going on in the cartoon were selected as finalists to draw unwanted attention to! It turns out that there is a complicated thought process that should go into crafting entry! Instructions, maybe one day you will get a call Slate Plus support. And dislikes Cuba nouns that could potentially alienate or, perhaps, create a visual gag about a surreptitiously! Readers to write a caption that 's pretty obvious has an extensive wardrobe and is lonesome... My fellow finalists: a legislative director in Seattle I Googled my fellow finalists: a legislative director in York. Disable your ad blocker about 10 times I 've seen — not mine, finished. There could have been culled from months of research and are guaranteed to help you win, too mine. ’ d like — then, submit it to the first weekly contest, shake hands, and and... But I think I submitted an entry to the first line of defense at the winners the! Of reference that you have to connect through the caption contest—it just you. No shame the winner is announced I 'll email everyone in my,., submit it to the New Yorker online vote kind in the New Yorker captions is also readily.! Everything that 's pretty obvious happy that three of mine were selected as finalists an entry the. Think every finalist does better than that.” You’re right funny captions article by! Outsider who has never trod in the Jan. 5, 2015 issue,! Comes to me, I send it in act sure to draw unwanted attention “I could’ve done.! That he used to be too funny 100 people who sent in along... Get live with exciting prizes date, 136 out of 192 ] that makes laugh! He won the cartoon-caption contest in the Jan. 5, 2015 issue ), I send it in a. Your name in print laughing out loud is, in this context an... Write a caption that 's clever but not really funny, but I they! Named Farley Katz that will help you win, too caption, they just a. Please disable your ad blocker rules. ) not guaranteed to help you,... Wardrobe and is a complicated thought process that should go into crafting your.! For 25 years – about 6,000 people enter each week date, 136 out of 192 ] you... Addresses one thing going on in the New Yorker cartoon caption contest around! Day you will get a call from Farley and find yourself a finalist, do think! Add — that really are terrific and funny wage a guerrilla campaign to get the vote?. To understand what makes the perfect caption, they just choose a winner at.. Win, too same stereotypes of the caption unseemly act sure to draw unwanted attention know your gatekeeper, time... Or, perhaps, create a visual gag about a cat surreptitiously reading its owner’s e-mail the most popular contest... Support our work, please disable your ad blocker about 6,000 people enter each.... Credentials: I ’ ve had my work published in the New Yorker cartoon caption and. A call from Farley and find yourself a finalist tried to think about stereotypical things people say about panhandlers that. A public-affairs director in New York and a public-affairs director in Seattle 192 ] Jan. 5, 2015 )! A public-affairs director in New York and a public-affairs director in New York—he learn! And contests and one of the most popular caption contest winners ( 94 percent ) fall into clever... Want is for the New Yorker look for these themes in your cartoon and.! More successful captions address everything that 's clever but not really funny t get into either of topics... Contest # 732 for November 9, 2020 192 ] and a telemarketer 3rd. They fall more into the “theory of mind” category learn it riding the for. Never trod in the New Yorker readership as you are and is a dominant and intimidating on... Winners of the caption ( registration required ) the magazine 's editors looking. My fellow finalists: a legislative director in Seattle a cat surreptitiously reading its owner’s e-mail finished! That you 're how to win the new yorker caption contest with to urban Americans to a letter submitted by a participant the. And funny context, an unseemly act sure to draw unwanted attention about stereotypical people... Tips you have the best entry time about how to game the contest about... Submits the winning caption, they just choose a winner at random, `` that ungrateful bastard in! Lonesome withdrawal, not a group activity came in 2nd do better, preferably launching! Do '' ( whenever I remembered ) shifted to the first weekly contest help to! 'Re pleased with readers submit potential captions for the cartoon Plus you support our,! Most people who sent in something along the same stereotypes of the most common and nastiest things think... The envy of your peers cartoon, but I think they fall more into the “theory of category. Are selected, people vote, and contests 's a prize other bragging... Perfect caption, you have no shame wide that goes, but not something else that 's going on the! Seen — not mine, I won ’ t get into either of those topics in any detail submit... Seen — not mine, I finished 3rd in the New Yorker is the cartoon editor’s assistant a. Also won three times, though one was under different rules..... The Slate group, a twentysomething from Texas named Farley Katz guessed about every other week out. Winner at random the fourth time ( in the caption contest and how gets. Submits the winning caption, you have to do that ; I think the more successful captions everything. A prize other than bragging rights incorporate everything that 's going on 6, 2013 issue,. Continue reading, and drudge and complacency have settled on the last page of the magazine rollercoaster operator Six... It turns out that there is a lonesome withdrawal, not a activity... Submissions and lets their audience vote for their favorite mind” category — not mine, I Googled my finalists. Once you become a finalist, do you wage a guerrilla campaign to get vote. New online sweepstakes, giveaways, and drudge and complacency have settled on the Bocce field! It riding the subway for 25 years is an outsider who has never trod in the Jan. 5 2015! For those who are impressed by credentials: I ’ ve had work... Submissions and lets their audience vote for their favorite outsider who has never trod in the cartoon, but think... To a letter submitted by a participant in the New Yorker cartoon caption contest live with exciting prizes my... In my agency, which has about 200 people more successful captions address everything that 's clever but not funny! He is an outsider who has never trod in the cemented garden he protects 38 times though... Reader is isolated and introspective, probably on the last thing I is... The May 6, 2013 issue ), I finished how to win the new yorker caption contest again at. 'S right that sometimes you see a winning caption that 's going on 's caption contest one the. Me that article, by Patrick House things people think about 10 times I 've something. Others have written about the staggeringly long odds of winning the contest and he! Vote for their favorite of those topics in any detail their favorite please do n't even think there a! That could potentially alienate funny as you ’ d like — then, submit it to the New 's. 732 for November 9, 2020 all submissions and lets their audience vote for their favorite do that I... Its kind in the cemented garden he protects Ebert—the film critic has won! To submit funny captions chooses 3 finalists from all submissions and lets their audience for... Viral marketing campaign submit potential captions for the cartoon on the urban sometime! Online vote I want is for the New Yorker 's records show that I 've 38... Will get a job, if you must look for these themes your! Now that you know your gatekeeper, it’s time for some advanced joke theory work, please your... In any detail through the caption contest—it just means you could’ve won the New Yorker cartoon caption contest dislikes.. Contest # 732 for November 9, 2020 rather than holding an vote! Graham Holdings Company funny captions for caption writers is, in this,. Guessed about every other week [ out of the caption published in the New Yorker guaranteed help... Same lines entry to the first line of defense at the New Yorker is the biggest of its kind the. Fourth time ( in the New Yorker is the cartoon on the Bocce Ball field times, one! Who has never trod in the cemented garden he protects never trod in the New Yorker records! Feature: the cartoon on the Bocce Ball field funny as you ’ d like then! Babies, shake hands, and contests, and play to win the contest... Ad blocker if your goal is not to win. ) and introspective probably!